glaciofluvial deposit


glaciofluvial deposit
   Material moved by glaciers and subsequently sorted and deposited by streams flowing from the melting ice. The deposits are stratified and may occur in the form of outwash plains, valley trains, deltas, kames, eskers, and kame terraces.
   Compare: drift and outwash.
   HP

Glossary of landform and geologic terms. 2013.

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